Amelia Hunt

Amelia Hunt

Postdoctoral Fellow
Harvard University Vision Sciences Laboratory
33 Kirkland Street, 7th floor
Cambridge, MA 02138
Phone: 617.495.3884, extension 5
Email: ahunt {at} wjh.harvard.edu
Download my CV.

Research Interests

Eye movements are an excellent tool for understanding cognitive processes because they are a very frequent and natural behavior, they are easy to measure, and each movement provides multifaceted information about timing and landing position. Despite these qualities, eye movements also pose two specific limitations; 1) they both determine and distort the visual input itself, and 2) they may to some extent represent a unique motor system relative to the vast range of other behaviors we can perform. These “limitations” both hold great interest for me, and provide the foundation for most of my research.

Some current research topics include:
1. Distortions of perception before and during eye movements
2. Perception of eye position
3. The degree to which motor responses are influenced by visual illusions
4. The link between attention and eye movements relative to other kinds of motor actions
5. Biological motion perception

Education

PhD (November 2005)
Supervisor: Dr. Alan Kingstone
University of British Columbia, Vancouver, B.C.

MA (November 2002)
Supervisor: Dr. Alan Kingstone
University of British Columbia, Vancouver, B.C.

B.Sc. (April 1999)
Supervisor: Dr. Raymond Klein
Dalhousie University, Halifax, N.S.

First-Author Publications

Hunt, A.R. & Halper, F. (in press). Disorganizing Biological Motion. Journal of Vision.

Hunt, A.R., Chapman, C.S. & Kingstone, A. (in press). Taking a long look at action and time perception. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance.

Hunt, A.R., Cooper, R.M., Hungr, C., & Kingstone, A. (2007). The effects of emotional stimuli on eye movements and attention. Visual Cognition. [pdf]

Hunt, A.R., von Mühlenen, A., & Kingstone, A. (2007). The timecourse of attentional and oculomotor capture reveals a common cause. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance. [pdf]

Hunt, A.R., Ishigami, Y. & Klein, R.M. (2006). Eye movements, not hypercompatible mappings, are critical for the elimination of task set reconfiguration. Psychonomic Bulletin and Review, 13, 932-937. [pdf]

Hunt, A.R. & Kingstone, A. (2004). Multisensory executive functioning. Brain and Cognition, 55, 325-327. [pdf]

Hunt, A.R., Olk, B., von Mühlenen, A., & Kingstone, A. (2004). Integration of competing saccade programs. Cognitive Brain Research, 19, 206-208. [pdf]

Hunt, A.R. & Kingstone, A. (2003). Inhibition of return: Dissociating attentional and oculomotor components. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 29, 1068-1074. [pdf]

Hunt, A.R. & Kingstone, A. (2003). Covert and overt voluntary attention: Linked or independent? Cognitive Brain Research, 18, 102-105. [pdf]

Hunt, A.R. & Klein, R.M. (2002). Eliminating the costs of task set reconfiguration. Memory and Cognition, 30, 529-539. [pdf]

Current Teaching

Psychology 975 (Comtemporary Issues in Psychology) Syllabus

Links

The Vision Sciences Lab (Harvard)

The BAR lab (UBC)

Ray Klein’s lab (Dalhousie)

www.newmanhunt.com (Personal site)

By popular demand, the object biomo demo (email me for an explanation!)